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How to Create A Custom Cutting and Ironing Table

 
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vvv LEARN EXACTLY HOW I MADE THIS! vvv

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HOW TO CREATE A CUSTOM CUTTING AND IRONING TABLE

— for under $500 in just 1 day —

PLUS A FREE DESIGN PLAN AND SHOPPING LIST DOWNLOAD!

TOTAL COST: $404.90

TOTAL TIME: 12 hours

MATERIALS: Download my FREE design plan and shopping list! It includes links to everything you need plus quantities, measurements, and cost. For other miscellaneous tools/supplies I used, please see the bottom of this post.


Special thank you to Brooks Ann. I morphed two of her DIY’s together with my own twist to get this lovely, custom cutting and ironing table for my home studio.


First things first, having a CUSTOM cutting table has made all of the difference in my design process. The beauty of this tutorial is that you can customize it any way you want. Want more storage or pull out drawers underneath? Go for it! Don’t need casters? That’s cool, you do you! So, I encourage you to take a moment to think about what is important to you for your table design.

 

Ok, let’s get started!

Here’s my design:

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Things that were important to me and my design:

  • Custom Height

  • Shelf for Storage

  • Casters (to move the table up against the wall if necessary #smallspaces)

  • White Table Top (to double as a backdrop for my products)

  • Ironing Friendly

  • Customized to match my space


STEP 1: CALCULATE YOUR CUSTOM TABLE HEIGHT

Use a counter or table to help you estimate the desired height of your cutting table. For me, I wanted to be sure that I could reach all the way across my table when cutting or patterning. I also knew that, in my home studio, I wouldn’t be wearing shoes (if you’ll be wearing footwear that changes your height, be sure to factor that in). Taking those things into consideration, I measured from my ideal bend point (on my body) to the floor. For me, my ideal table height is 36” (I am 5’5”).

 
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We will also need a few other measurements. If you are adding casters, like I did, record the height of your caster (it will be in the product description if you buy it online). For me, my casters were 5”.

Be sure to calculate your table top height based on the homasote and MDF board you will be using. The total thickness of my table top is 1 1/2”.

Now, use your table height to calculate the height of your legs:

TABLE HEIGHT - TABLE TOP THICKNESS - CASTER HEIGHT = LEG HEIGHT

My calculation:

36” - 1 1/2” - 5” = 29 1/2”

Your interior support leg will be shorter by the width of your beams, for me that is 3 1/2”. My interior support leg should be 26”.

I initially thought my beams were 4” wide, therefore I had to add some scraps of homasote to give it an extra 1/2”. Don’t make this mistake!

 
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Lastly, determine the length of your table. A standard cutting table is 8’ long. Due to space constraints in my studio, I shortened my table to 7’. If you can fit 8’ in your space, definitely do so! The more working space, the better. You also won’t have to cut down your MDF because it comes in 8’ sheets.

 

STEP 2: ORDER / BUY YOUR MATERIALS

I have created a free download of my design plans and shopping list so that you can easily create your own custom cutting table! My shopping list and plans are based on my own custom table, so be sure to double check how your custom measurements compare before ordering your supplies.

Click the image below for your free download:

No email required.

 
 

STEP 3: ASSEMBLING

Cut all of your supplies to size using the downloadable plan.

I wrote my measurements directly onto my wood along with the label for each piece to keep everything organized. I covered the marks with paint when finishing my table.

I wrote my measurements directly onto my wood along with the label for each piece to keep everything organized. I covered the marks with paint when finishing my table.

My trusty fiancé always willing to help me out with my projects! We just used a standard hand saw to cut our materials. It worked great!

My trusty fiancé always willing to help me out with my projects! We just used a standard hand saw to cut our materials. It worked great!

Screw together your base for your table top. Use your 3 beams (6’ 6”) and 2 supports (42”) to create a rectangle with one support in the center.

Screw together your shelf base. Use your 3 beams (6’ 6”) and 2 supports (39”) to create a rectangle with one support in the center. Add the MDF on top of your shelf and nail it into your base.

Note that there is a center support beam in both the table base and shelf base.

Note that there is a center support beam in both the table base and shelf base.

Screw all 4 table legs to the support legs, keeping one side flush for the bottom. Line up the legs with the bottom of your shelf and attach with screws.

We screwed the table legs and leg supports together with 3 screws at each side.

We screwed the table legs and leg supports together with 3 screws at each side.

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Attach your casters, one side screwed to the shelf base, one side screwed to the table leg.

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Slip the table base into the slots of the leg supports. Screw the legs into the table base. Lay down your MDF and nail to your table base. Lay your homasote on top of the MDF - do not nail or screw the homasote to the MDF.

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Be sure to nail your MDF board to your table base. Screwing it will cause it to crack and split.

Be sure to nail your MDF board to your table base. Screwing it will cause it to crack and split.

The MDF is the bottom layer here, with the homasote (sound board) on top. The homasote will be held down with the fabric, so no need to secure it.

The MDF is the bottom layer here, with the homasote (sound board) on top. The homasote will be held down with the fabric, so no need to secure it.

 

STEP 4: MAKE IT PRETTY

If you choose to paint your table (optional), add a few layers of paint. I wanted a more rustic finish to the wood, so I painted it roughly with a few coats of standard white house paint. I just used one of the small tester cans from my local Ace and still had lots left over! If you want a more finished look, consider painting the wood before assembling your table.

Take your batting and lay it on top of your table top. Depending on the thickness of your batting you may need anywhere from 1-3 layers. I chose to only use one layer. Use your staple gun to pull the batting taught and work your way around the table top edge stapling as you go, this will hold down your homasote layer. Now, add the duck cloth on top and repeat. Your table is now ironing ready!

If you choose to add fabric to the bottom shelf (optional), follow the same method. Pull the fabric taught and work your way around the table using your staple gun to secure. I folded the edges under before stapling to create a clean finish. I carefully cut slits around where the table legs connect to the shelf base.

Think of this like wrapping a present. There’s no right or wrong way, just do what works for you! Be sure to get fabric that is wide enough to wrap around the sides of your table top and base.

Think of this like wrapping a present. There’s no right or wrong way, just do what works for you! Be sure to get fabric that is wide enough to wrap around the sides of your table top and base.

Finally, add your curtain rod hooks and slip your dowel rod through to create a paper holder.

And you’re done!

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CARE

This table is pretty easy to take care of! Just wipe large debris off and follow up with a lint roller to get fuzz, hairs, and any small bits. Be sure to put down a cutting mat if you are using a rotary cutter or box knife for your projects.

Over time, the fabric may get dirty or worn out. Duck cloth is incredibly affordable so just replace if necessary in the future.

Thank you so much for reading! If you tried this out, I’d love to hear from you. Find me on Instagram or use my hashtag #technicaldesigncommunity . You can always reach out to me directly on my contact page if you have questions or comments.

If you loved this tutorial and free download, then don’t hesitate to subscribe to my mailing list! You’ll get all sorts of goodies and you’ll be the first to know when a new tutorial comes out.


This DIY assumes you have some of these things already so I haven’t listed them above, but here are the other tools I used.

Other things you may need:

  • Screws

  • Nails

  • Staple gun w/ staples

  • Saw (hand or electric)

  • Drill

  • Hammer

  • Paint and paint brush (optional)

  • Ruler / Tape Measure