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Introduction to Technical Flats - Part 3 of 10

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INTRODUCTION TO TECHNICAL FLATS

SECTION 3: FLATS INTRODUCTION

Today we’re going to go over exactly how I create my flats. I’ll give you an inside look on my methods and the reasoning behind why I love to draw my flats this way.

Need to catch up? Read Section 2: Scale

 

Follow along with this step-by-step video!

For this tutorial, I would definitely suggest checking out the video! The blog goes through my method, but for detailed instructions, the video really covers it all.

 

HOW TO DRAW A FLAT SKETCH


 
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Begin with the outline of your garment, you can always manipulate it later. Draw half of the garment only with it split in the middle, vertically.

QUICK TIPS:

  • When creating a curve, intersect your middle guide at 90 degrees. This ensures a smooth curve when you connect your points. See: neck and hem

  • Start your outline at 2pt line width

  • Do not add any details, yet.

 
 
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Select your object and right click (PC) or [control+click] (Mac) then choose Transform > Reflect. Select “Vertical” and click Copy. Click the new copy and drag to the other side of the guide holding shift to keep it level.

To join the two objects, select both and right click (PC) or [control+click] (Mac), select Join. Repeat: right click (PC) or [control+click] (Mac), select Join to join both the top and bottom.

QUICK TIPS:

  • Does it look proportional? Make any changes necessary to the shape, but always make the same changes to both sides.

 
 
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Begin adding details to one side only.

QUICK TIPS:

  • Hems inside the shape = 1pt line weight

  • All seams inside the shape = .75pt line weight

  • All stitch lines = .5pt dashed line at 1.5pt dash and 1.5pt gap

 
 
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Repeat the steps above to reflect the details and connect the shapes.

 
 
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Highlight all parts of the drawing and right click (PC) or [control+click] (Mac), select Group. Now the sketch is grouped and can be moved entirely with all of the parts attached. If you’d like to edit the sketch more you can right click (PC) or [control+click] (Mac) and select Ungroup. Or if you’d like to keep the sketch grouped, you can double click the object to isolate its parts.

Now you have a complete flat sketch!

To draw the back of the garment, copy and paste your outline. Then, follow the same steps as above to add the details of the back.

 
 
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Movement lines are sometimes necessary to show the drape of the fabric. It really depends on what your personal style is or what you’re trying to convey. In my experience, movement lines are used best to illustrate volume, darts, pleats, or ruffles. However, some schools of thought want them included on every sketch. This can be problematic when sending sketches to the factory because they can be misunderstood as seam lines.

To create movement lines, draw random drag lines on the garment. Change the weight to .25pt and the profile to width profile 1 (the first option in the dropdown menu).

 

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