POINTS of MEASURE

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DIY Technical Design Section 5: Points of Measure

Hey guys, welcome back! Here in Section 5 we are going to be diving into Points of Measure. Here’s what you’ll learn in this section:

  • Set up a POM page in the Tech Pack and use it to spec your garment

  • Use POM codes and my fool-proof formula to develop your own POM library

  • Learn what tolerance is and how to determine tolerance for your unique POM’s

  • Create your very own How to Measure Guide



POINTS OF MEASURE

Let’s remind ourselves what the Points of Measure page in our Tech Pack is. The POM page is a library where you will house your standards for speccing your garment. On this page you will also include the tolerance for each point and the grade for your brand. It’s important to create a clear standard with your factory by having a corresponding How to Measure Guide that illustrates how to measure each point.

The Graded Spec page is where you will spec your garment for your full size run. Using your POM library you can include POM’s specific to the style to create the spec page for the development of your garment.

POM numbers allow you to quickly fill out your POM’s on your Graded Spec page in the Tech Pack using the VLOOKUP function I teach in section 1. The function will pull all of the information from your POM library and automatically calculate your graded specs for your size run, simply by adding the POM code on the Graded Spec page. Not only that, but POM codes act as a shorthand identifier for prototype review comments. Your POM numbers also correspond to your How To Measure Guide where you and your factory can reference your brands standards for how to measure your garments.



TOLERANCE

Tolerance is the amount you are willing to accept POM’s off of spec. Your tolerance for prototyping is typically more strict than your tolerance for production. For example, your tolerance for sleeve length may be +/- 1/2” meaning you are willing to accept a sample that falls 1/2” above or below the spec you requested. When you review your sample, if the measurements fall outside of that tolerance you can reject the sample or tell the factory to go back to spec (BTS) for the next sample.



POM FORMULA

Here’s my fool-proof formula for writing POM descriptions. You always want to clearly define the type of measurement, location, and starting and stopping point when writing POM descriptions.

[POM #] - [POM name] [Full Measure or 1/2 Measure]: Measure [type of measurement (width/length/height/etc.)] from [starting location] to [stopping location] at [location]

Ex:

#004 - WAIST WIDTH (1/2 MEASURE): MEASURE WIDTH FROM SIDE TO SIDE AT WAIST.



POM PAGE & GRADED SPEC

As I said before, your POM page will house all of your POM’s, your tolerance, and your grade. Those POM’s can then be added to your Graded Spec Page with your specific garment measurements. For information on how I set up the graded spec page and the POM page template in the tech pack, head to Section 1 of this series.

Here’s a video tutorial. The POM and Graded Spec section starts at 02:20:

 

HOW TO SET UP YOUR POM & GRADED SPEC PAGES

  1. Create your POM’s using the formula above. Be sure to give each POM it’s own unique code (number).

  2. Add the tolerance appropriate for each POM.

  3. Add your size range and determine your grade using the information from Section 3 of this series.

  4. Input the grade as a +/- in comparison to the base size.

  5. Use the VLOOKUP formula from Section 1 of this series to link your POM list to your Graded Spec page.

  6. Add your POM identifier / code to the appropriate column. The POM you created in step 1 should automatically appear if you used the VLOOKUP formula.

  7. Enter your base size specs for each of your POM’s. The grade will automatically calculate if you used the VLOOKUP formula. If you’re wondering how to determine your base size specs, we won’t be covering that in this series. An easy method is to measure a retail sample and use the specs from it as a base line to determine your own specs. I plan to cover this in a future series, but hopefully this method will be helpful for now!

 
pom-list-example-points-of-measure.jpg
 

GOOD PRACTICES & STRATEGY

  • Never “box in” your factory with specs. Give them enough measurements to create the garment, but give them room to adjust the pattern as necessary. For example, Give them the armhole drop and shoulder slope to determine the sleeve opening shape, don’t give them the armhole circumference in addition to that.

  • Don’t duplicate information, each POM should be unique.

  • Create your POM codes in a particular order, making it easier for you to remember, and for you/your factory to measure the garment. Think of an order that makes sense for you and your brand.

  • Add detailed POM’s for specific garments, like POM’s to determine a specific pocket or collar shape. Don’t add those measurements to the sketch, keep it on your Graded Spec Page.

  • You may need to adjust your POM descriptions for specific styles. For example, if you have a pant without a waistband, you’d want to update the POM’s to say “measure to top edge” instead of “measure to waistband seam.”

 

HOW TO MEASURE GUIDE

Your How to Measure Guide correlates directly to your list of POM’s. For each POM you will have a sketch or image that shows exactly how to measure it on the garment. You can use drawings or photos to create your HTM Guide.

A HTM Guide is important because it allows you to share your standard of measurement with your factory or other members of your team. If there is a discrepancy in how something was measured during patterning or reviewing, you and your factory can rely on the HTM Guide as the standard.

There are many ways to measure the same point, so it’s important to illustrate what the standard is for your specific brand. Doing so will save you a lot of headaches throughout the development process!

HOW TO CREATE A HTM GUIDE

Watch the video above for the full DIY. The How To Measure Guide DIY starts at 10:18.

 
how-to-measure-guide-example-points-of-measure.jpg
 
  1. To make a HTM Guide start with your POM list that you created in part 1.

  2. For each POM either, (a) take a picture of a garment with a measuring tape laid across it where you’d like it measured, or (b) draw a simple sketch of a garment with an arrow or line showing the measurement.

  3. Arrange your images/sketches into a PDF with the POM Code and POM description.

  4. Title the PDF “HOW TO MEASURE: [TOPS / BOTTOMS / DRESSES / OTHER]”

  5. Finally, add page numbers and the date you created it.

 

WANT TO SKIP THE DIY?

I’ve created a comprehensive Points of Measure List and How to Measure guide! There’s 100 unique Points of Measure, each with their own tolerance and illustration. Skip the DIY and download your library instantly! Check it out:

 
 
 

Thanks for following along! Section 6 will focus on the Bill of Materials (BOM) and will launch on Thursday, 8/1/19.

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